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GOP lawmakers leave the state to avoid vote on cap-and-trade bill

On Wednesday, Governor Brown said that she was preparing to call a special session and had been in contact with state police to ensure that votes went forward.

Posted: Jun 20, 2019 9:48 AM
Updated: Jun 20, 2019 3:12 PM

By SARAH ZIMMERMAN and GILLIAN FLACCUS Associated Press

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — Oregon Gov. Kate Brown deployed the state police Thursday to try to round up Republican lawmakers who fled the Capitol in an attempt to block a vote on a landmark climate plan that would be the second of its kind in the nation.

Minority Republicans want the cap-and-trade proposal, which is aimed at dramatically lowering the state's greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, to be sent to voters instead of being instituted by lawmakers — but negotiations with Democrats collapsed, leading to the walkout, Kate Gillem, a spokeswoman for Senate Republicans said Thursday.

Brown had warned a day earlier that she was in "close communication with Oregon State Police" and "prepared to use all resources and tools available."

Oregon State Police can force any senators they track down in Oregon into a patrol car to return them to the Capitol.

"Send bachelors and come heavily armed," Sen. Brian Boquist, a Republican from Dallas, said late Wednesday as the prospect of a walkout loomed. "I'm not going to be a political prisoner in the state of Oregon. It's just that simple."

Boquist, who is reportedly in Idaho, did not respond to emails on Thursday after the Senate president publicly rebuked him for the remarks.

Gillem confirmed on Thursday that some members left the state to avoid a vote because state police don't have jurisdiction outside Oregon.

Democrats have an 18 to 12 majority in the chamber, but need 20 members present for a quorum.

This is the second time in this legislative session that minority GOP lawmakers have used a high-stakes walkout as a way to slow the process. Democrats have a rare supermajority in the House and Senate, meaning their Republican colleagues don't have many ways to influence the debate on major policy bills that would affect their constituents.

Republicans walked out of the Senate last month to block a school funding tax package. The standoff lasted four days, until the governor struck a deal to table legislation on gun control and vaccine requirements.

The tactic is rare, but it has been used throughout history, sometimes creating comical scenes. Abraham Lincoln once leapt out of a window in an attempt to deny a quorum when he was a lawmaker in Illinois. In Washington three decades ago, U.S. Sen. Bob Packwood, R-Oregon, was carried feet first into the Senate chamber after Democrats ordered the arrest of Republican senators who were denying a quorum.

In 2003, Texas Democrats fled to neighboring Oklahoma to deny a quorum, holing up in a Holiday Inn to block a GOP redistricting bill. The Republican House speaker ordered state troopers to find the Democrats and have them arrested. The Democrats returned to Texas after the bill's deadline passed, and it was effectively killed.

On Thursday, Oregon's Senate president pleaded with Republicans to return.

"I beg and beseech my fellow legislators to come to the floor. I need you, the Legislature needs you, the people of Oregon need you to pass budgets to take care of our citizens," Senate President Peter Courtney said in an emotional plea on the Senate floor. "I cannot do it without you. We cannot do it without you."

The walkout brings all Senate business to a halt with just over a week left in the legislative session. Senators still need to vote on the budget as well as legislation on affordable housing, paid family medical leave and an increased tobacco tax.

But the cap-and-trade legislation remains a sticking point.

Under the proposed bill, Oregon would put an overall limit on greenhouse gas emissions and auction off pollution "allowances" for each ton of carbon industries plan to emit. The legislation would lower that cap over time to encourage businesses to move away from fossil fuels: The state would reduce emissions to 45% below 1990 levels by 2035, and 80% below 1990 levels by 2050.

Those opposed to the cap-and-trade plan say it would exacerbate a growing divide between the liberal, urban parts of the state and the rural areas, which tend to be more conservative. The plan would increase the cost of fuel, damaging small business, truckers and the logging industry, which is already in freefall due to federal environmental protections, they say.


READ: Loggers gather at state capitol to protest cap-and-trade legislation


"Protesting cap and trade by walking out today represents our constituency and exactly how we should be doing our job," said Senate Republican Leader Herman Baertschiger, Jr., of Grants Pass.

Under the proposed cap and trade program, the state would put an overall limit on greenhouse gas emissions and auction off pollution "allowances" for each ton of carbon industries plan to emit.

The legislation would lower that cap over time to encourage businesses to move away from fossil fuels: The state would reduce emissions to 45% below 1990 levels by 2035, and 80% below 1990 levels by 2050.

Democrats have presented the proposal as an efficient way to lower emissions while investing in low-income and rural communities' ability to adapt to climate change. It has the support of environmental groups, farmworkers and some trade unions.

"Protesting cap and trade by walking out today represents our constituency and exactly how we should be doing our job," said Senate Republican Leader Herman Baertschiger, Jr., of Grants Pass.

A small group of loggers gathered to protest outside the Capitol on Thursday.

Bridger Hasbrouck, a 32-year-old self-employed logger from Dallas, Oregon, said the bill if passed would be "devastating" to his business because he uses diesel fuel to power all his logging equipment.

"There's a whole lot involved but the biggest thing that's very crippling is the fact that these bills would impose regulations that would take trucks off the road that people are using to earn their living," he said. "The American dream of owning a small business, it starts to go away."

Democrats say the measure is an efficient way to lower emissions while investing in low-income and rural communities' ability to adapt to climate change. It has the support of environmental groups, farmworkers and some trade unions.

The proposal also contains a $10 million investment to protect workers adversely affected by climate change policy, as some in transportation or manufacturing sector could face layoffs. The legislation provides unemployment benefits and pathways to clean energy jobs that, under the law, must provide competitive wages and benefits.

" 'Rural' here is not one voice," said Mimi Casteel, a farmer in rural Hopewell, Oregon.

"This is not just about gas prices — this is about the future of humanity. If Oregon can't be a leader in this particular case, then I don't think we have a very strong foot to stand on."

California has had for a decade an economy-wide cap and trade policy like the one Oregon is considering. Nine northeastern states have more limited cap-and-trade programs that target only the power sector.

Brown, a Democrat, said Wednesday she's willing to extend the legislative session — due to end next week — to keep the bill alive.

Oregon Coronavirus Cases

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Confirmed Cases: 42436

Reported Deaths: 655
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Multnomah9228160
Marion5858108
Washington579076
Umatilla335444
Clackamas313965
Lane239227
Malheur191738
Jackson16846
Deschutes113213
Yamhill99415
Linn81015
Polk65415
Jefferson6049
Morrow5456
Lincoln51713
Union4672
Benton4426
Klamath4113
Douglas3506
Wasco34715
Hood River2771
Josephine2673
Columbia2661
Coos2460
Clatsop2430
Baker1203
Crook1092
Tillamook700
Curry571
Wallowa442
Lake370
Harney230
Sherman190
Gilliam110
Grant110
Wheeler10
Unassigned00

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Confirmed Cases: 910438

Reported Deaths: 17386
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Los Angeles3006147000
Riverside667321295
San Bernardino627741072
Orange587251447
San Diego54941870
Kern33881416
Fresno30858436
Sacramento25445484
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Alameda23391461
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Contra Costa18694242
Stanislaus17686397
Tulare17495286
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Imperial12882336
San Francisco12152140
Monterey1139991
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Santa Barbara9814120
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Kings824683
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Marin7089128
Madera502074
Placer417857
San Luis Obispo414132
Yolo320759
Butte308752
Santa Cruz280225
Napa196215
Shasta188930
Sutter183712
San Benito144215
El Dorado13284
Yuba129310
Mendocino112921
Tehama8808
Lassen7661
Lake69515
Glenn6573
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Humboldt56710
Colusa5506
Calaveras34218
Amador33016
Tuolumne2714
Inyo22715
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