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Hurricane Season Fast Facts

Here's a look at what you need to know about the Atlantic hurrican...

Posted: May 7, 2018 1:53 PM
Updated: May 7, 2018 1:53 PM

Here's a look at what you need to know about the Atlantic hurricane season, which runs from June 1 to November 30.

Facts:
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration defines a hurricane as "an intense tropical weather system with well-defined circulation and sustained winds of 74 mph (64 knots) or higher." In the western Pacific Ocean, hurricanes are called typhoons while similar storms in the Indian Ocean are called cyclones.

The peak of the Atlantic season is from mid-August to late October.

Hurricanes are rated according to intensity on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

The 1-5 scale estimates potential property damage.

A Category 3 or higher is considered a major hurricane.

A hurricane watch indicates the possibility that a region could experience hurricane conditions within 48 hours.

A hurricane warning indicates that tropical-storm-force winds of at least 74 mph are expected within 36 hours.

Hurricane Development:
There are four stages of development: tropical disturbance, tropical depression, tropical storm, tropical cyclone (hurricane).

Tropical disturbance: Cloud columns develop into a cluster of thunderstorms.

Tropical depression: Thunderstorms intensify, with maximum sustained winds of 38 mph.

Tropical storm: Maximum sustained winds are between 39-73 mph. During this time, the storm becomes more circular in shape, with winds swirling around a calm center, known as the eye. This is when the storm is named.

Tropical cyclone (hurricane): Wind speeds reach 74 mph. The storm is at least 50,000 feet high and 125 miles across, rotating around an eye that spans 5-30 miles wide.

Hurricane categories:
Category 1: Minimal hurricane
Winds 74-95 mph.

Storm surge 3-5 feet.

No significant damage to buildings. Damage primarily to unanchored homes, shrubbery and trees.

Some damage to poorly constructed signs and coastal road flooding with minor pier damage.

Damage to power lines and poles could result in power outages lasting several days.

Category 2: Moderate hurricane
Winds 96-110 mph.

Storm surge 6-8 feet.

Some damage to buildings, mainly roofs, doors and windows. Considerable damage to shrubbery and trees with some trees blown down. Major damage to mobile homes. Extensive damage to poorly constructed signs and considerable damage to piers.

Small craft in unprotected anchorages may break moorings.

Power outages could last from several days to weeks.

Category 3: Extensive hurricane
Winds 111-130 mph.

Storm surge 9-12 feet.

Some structural damage to small buildings. Many large trees blown down. Rampant destruction of mobile homes in storms ranked category 3 or higher. Serious coastal flooding, damaging or destroying structures along the water.

Evacuation of low-lying residences within several blocks of the shoreline may be required.

Electricity and water may be unavailable for several days to a few weeks.

Category 4: Extreme hurricane
Winds 131-155 mph.

Storm surge 13-18 feet.

Extensive building damage to windows and doors as well as roof collapse in some small residences. Shrubs, trees and signs are blown down. Major damage to lower floors of buildings near coastline due to flooding, battering waves and floating debris. Major beach erosion.

Power outages could last from weeks to possibly months. Areas may be uninhabitable for weeks or months.

Category 5: Catastrophic hurricane
Winds greater than 155 mph.

Storm surge higher than 18 feet.

Complete roof failure on many residences and industrial buildings. Widespread destruction of structures less than 15 feet above sea level within 500 yards of shore. Low-lying evacuation routes cut off by rising water 3 to 5 hours before hurricane center arrives.

Advance evacuation of residential areas on low ground within 5-10 miles of the shoreline may be required.

Power outages could last for months. Area may remain uninhabitable for months.

Names:
There are ten regional lists of names worldwide: Atlantic, Eastern North Pacific, Central North Pacific, Western North Pacific/South China Sea, Australian Region, Nadi, Port Moresby, Jakarta, Southwest Indian Ocean and Northern Indian Ocean.

Using women's names for Atlantic storms was the practice until 1979, when male names were added to the mix.

The World Meteorological Organization's Hurricane Committee creates lists of hurricane names that are recycled every six years.

Names associated with storms that have caused significant death and/or damage are retired from the list. After an active 2017 hurricane season, NOAA announced the names Harvey, Irma, Maria and Nate were being retired. Other names that have been removed include Camille (1969), Andrew (1992), Opal (1995), Floyd (1999), Ivan (2004), Katrina (2005), Ike (2008) and Sandy (2012). Once a name is removed, another name replaces it.

Oregon Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Cases: 70832

Reported Deaths: 885
CountyCasesDeaths
Multnomah15875232
Washington997499
Marion9017137
Clackamas585377
Umatilla430149
Lane420241
Jackson364428
Malheur237942
Deschutes222814
Yamhill164816
Linn138522
Polk116816
Douglas91217
Jefferson80811
Union7715
Benton7667
Klamath7604
Morrow6517
Lincoln61315
Wasco51919
Josephine5104
Columbia4783
Coos4182
Hood River3941
Clatsop3510
Baker2723
Crook2176
Grant1341
Curry1292
Tillamook1230
Lake1171
Harney961
Wallowa713
Sherman230
Gilliam220
Wheeler30
Unassigned00

California Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Cases: 1185576

Reported Deaths: 19089
CountyCasesDeaths
Los Angeles3877937604
San Bernardino902221129
Riverside857741437
San Diego76359996
Orange750951577
Kern40337448
Fresno37724481
Sacramento35854566
Santa Clara32985476
Alameda28857505
San Joaquin25738502
Contra Costa23571261
Stanislaus21460424
Tulare20649308
Ventura19058175
Imperial15862356
San Francisco15156160
Monterey14750116
San Mateo13715170
Sonoma11922157
Merced11537179
Santa Barbara11277135
Kings1047587
Solano1003681
Marin7628129
Placer635468
Madera604785
San Luis Obispo596435
Shasta471847
Yolo462675
Santa Cruz426928
Butte389459
Sutter314415
Napa298817
El Dorado22174
Yuba198110
San Benito183716
Lassen17733
Tehama161225
Mendocino148522
Nevada11849
Tuolumne9088
Glenn8928
Lake89019
Humboldt8509
Colusa6946
Siskiyou6242
Mono5273
Amador52016
Calaveras47822
Del Norte3131
Inyo29016
Plumas2050
Trinity1390
Mariposa1282
Modoc1250
Alpine470
Sierra190
Unassigned00
Medford
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