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Hurricane Season Fast Facts

Here's a look at what you need to know about the Atlantic hurrican...

Posted: May 7, 2018 1:53 PM
Updated: May 7, 2018 1:53 PM

Here's a look at what you need to know about the Atlantic hurricane season, which runs from June 1 to November 30.

Facts:
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration defines a hurricane as "an intense tropical weather system with well-defined circulation and sustained winds of 74 mph (64 knots) or higher." In the western Pacific Ocean, hurricanes are called typhoons while similar storms in the Indian Ocean are called cyclones.

The peak of the Atlantic season is from mid-August to late October.

Hurricanes are rated according to intensity on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

The 1-5 scale estimates potential property damage.

A Category 3 or higher is considered a major hurricane.

A hurricane watch indicates the possibility that a region could experience hurricane conditions within 48 hours.

A hurricane warning indicates that tropical-storm-force winds of at least 74 mph are expected within 36 hours.

Hurricane Development:
There are four stages of development: tropical disturbance, tropical depression, tropical storm, tropical cyclone (hurricane).

Tropical disturbance: Cloud columns develop into a cluster of thunderstorms.

Tropical depression: Thunderstorms intensify, with maximum sustained winds of 38 mph.

Tropical storm: Maximum sustained winds are between 39-73 mph. During this time, the storm becomes more circular in shape, with winds swirling around a calm center, known as the eye. This is when the storm is named.

Tropical cyclone (hurricane): Wind speeds reach 74 mph. The storm is at least 50,000 feet high and 125 miles across, rotating around an eye that spans 5-30 miles wide.

Hurricane categories:
Category 1: Minimal hurricane
Winds 74-95 mph.

Storm surge 3-5 feet.

No significant damage to buildings. Damage primarily to unanchored homes, shrubbery and trees.

Some damage to poorly constructed signs and coastal road flooding with minor pier damage.

Damage to power lines and poles could result in power outages lasting several days.

Category 2: Moderate hurricane
Winds 96-110 mph.

Storm surge 6-8 feet.

Some damage to buildings, mainly roofs, doors and windows. Considerable damage to shrubbery and trees with some trees blown down. Major damage to mobile homes. Extensive damage to poorly constructed signs and considerable damage to piers.

Small craft in unprotected anchorages may break moorings.

Power outages could last from several days to weeks.

Category 3: Extensive hurricane
Winds 111-130 mph.

Storm surge 9-12 feet.

Some structural damage to small buildings. Many large trees blown down. Rampant destruction of mobile homes in storms ranked category 3 or higher. Serious coastal flooding, damaging or destroying structures along the water.

Evacuation of low-lying residences within several blocks of the shoreline may be required.

Electricity and water may be unavailable for several days to a few weeks.

Category 4: Extreme hurricane
Winds 131-155 mph.

Storm surge 13-18 feet.

Extensive building damage to windows and doors as well as roof collapse in some small residences. Shrubs, trees and signs are blown down. Major damage to lower floors of buildings near coastline due to flooding, battering waves and floating debris. Major beach erosion.

Power outages could last from weeks to possibly months. Areas may be uninhabitable for weeks or months.

Category 5: Catastrophic hurricane
Winds greater than 155 mph.

Storm surge higher than 18 feet.

Complete roof failure on many residences and industrial buildings. Widespread destruction of structures less than 15 feet above sea level within 500 yards of shore. Low-lying evacuation routes cut off by rising water 3 to 5 hours before hurricane center arrives.

Advance evacuation of residential areas on low ground within 5-10 miles of the shoreline may be required.

Power outages could last for months. Area may remain uninhabitable for months.

Names:
There are ten regional lists of names worldwide: Atlantic, Eastern North Pacific, Central North Pacific, Western North Pacific/South China Sea, Australian Region, Nadi, Port Moresby, Jakarta, Southwest Indian Ocean and Northern Indian Ocean.

Using women's names for Atlantic storms was the practice until 1979, when male names were added to the mix.

The World Meteorological Organization's Hurricane Committee creates lists of hurricane names that are recycled every six years.

Names associated with storms that have caused significant death and/or damage are retired from the list. After an active 2017 hurricane season, NOAA announced the names Harvey, Irma, Maria and Nate were being retired. Other names that have been removed include Camille (1969), Andrew (1992), Opal (1995), Floyd (1999), Ivan (2004), Katrina (2005), Ike (2008) and Sandy (2012). Once a name is removed, another name replaces it.

Oregon Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Cases: 154554

Reported Deaths: 2204
CountyCasesDeaths
Multnomah31785528
Washington21060212
Marion18335285
Clackamas13310175
Lane10172126
Jackson8299111
Umatilla763181
Deschutes591859
Yamhill375964
Linn356556
Malheur334358
Polk302942
Klamath277455
Douglas242853
Benton231816
Josephine231649
Jefferson195028
Coos142519
Union127519
Columbia124321
Wasco122026
Lincoln112820
Hood River106329
Morrow104414
Clatsop7756
Crook77518
Baker6487
Curry4166
Tillamook4122
Lake3746
Harney2726
Grant2221
Wallowa1424
Gilliam531
Sherman530
Wheeler221
Unassigned00

California Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Cases: 3554629

Reported Deaths: 51395
CountyCasesDeaths
Los Angeles118754221106
Riverside2891853749
San Bernardino2853342673
Orange2603483889
San Diego2589823260
Santa Clara1098411765
Kern102627811
Fresno947941412
Sacramento929441464
Alameda800881224
Ventura77238834
San Joaquin665691082
Contra Costa62164674
Stanislaus55775944
Tulare47784746
Monterey42138327
San Mateo38763515
San Francisco34061398
Santa Barbara31763407
Solano29968164
Merced28915395
Sonoma27954298
Imperial26843589
Kings21951218
Placer19713231
San Luis Obispo19612227
Madera15390209
Santa Cruz14588183
Marin13136197
Yolo12760185
Shasta10944174
Butte10915160
El Dorado9095100
Napa897668
Sutter884597
San Benito574359
Yuba573336
Lassen560119
Tehama508152
Tuolumne394659
Nevada393274
Mendocino379643
Amador344441
Humboldt316033
Lake313440
Glenn221023
Colusa212813
Calaveras190547
Siskiyou174014
Inyo128736
Mono12114
Del Norte9875
Plumas6536
Modoc4524
Mariposa3947
Trinity3675
Sierra990
Alpine810
Unassigned00
Medford
Mostly Cloudy
47° wxIcon
Hi: 46° Lo: 35°
Feels Like: 41°
Brookings
Cloudy
46° wxIcon
Hi: 46° Lo: 36°
Feels Like: 42°
Medford
Cloudy
47° wxIcon
Hi: 22° Lo: 15°
Feels Like: 41°
Medford
Partly Cloudy
47° wxIcon
Hi: 47° Lo: 35°
Feels Like: 41°
Klamath Falls
Mostly Cloudy
36° wxIcon
Hi: 35° Lo: 26°
Feels Like: 28°
Drying out, winds diminish this weekend
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