Ask the Met: Largest Hailstone in U.S.

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST The largest hailstone ever recorded was 8″ in diameter, found in Vivian South Dakota on July 23, 2010. It’s circumference measured 18.62″ and weighed nearly 2 pounds! This hail was produced from a thunderstorm that moved through the state. Apparently it was even larger than what was measured but because the … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Tornadoes

 ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “Does it have to be a certain degree, super warm or super cold or in between, for a tornado to go a certain distance?” Sofie, Mae Richardson There is no correlation between contrasting air masses and the duration or direction of a tornado. In other words, the temperatures/clashing of air masses do not … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Newscast Preps

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “How long does it take you to get all the reports, satellite data and other data to do your weather forecasts? Cameron, Rae Micharson Love this question! Prepping for our newscasts requires a lot of work and a lot of time. Us meteorologists have to come in hours before we go live … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Hurricanes

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “Is it possible for a really small hurricane to be happening and for nobody to know about it?” Marcus, Mae Richardson Love this question Marcus! In this day and age, it would be very unlikely that a hurricane would develop and it would remain unknown. There are many resources available to meteorologists … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Winds at Night

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “Why does the wind typically die down in the evening hours?” Allison Waters, Mae Richardson The main reason the winds tend to die down in the overnight hours is because there is no sun. At nighttime, the surface and objects at the surface emit longwave radiation. This cools not only those … Continue reading »