Ask the Meteorologist – Hurricanes

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “How does a hurricane form?” Cydney Marley Kennedy Elementary School Hurricanes are the most violent storms on Earth and have a variety of names from typhoon in Japan to willy-willy in Australia, the scientific term for all is a tropical cyclone. Tropical cyclones are like giant engines that use warm, moist air … Continue reading »

Ask the Met: Hurricanes & Tornadoes

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “Do tornadoes and hurricanes turn the same way?” Chris Baker, Grants Pass For the most part, yes …hurricanes and tornadoes do spin the same way! Of course there always has to be a but and there is an exception to this “yes.” All hurricanes that are north of the equator spin … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist – Chetco Effect

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “I’ve been hearing a lot about the Chetco Effect, what is it?” Eric Knox SOU The Chetco Effect is a term to define the phenomenon in which dry adiabatic heating increases the temperature of an air mass as it descends the slopes where the Chetco River creates a valley and to a … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Rain & Snow

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “How does snow form from rain and then change back to snow?” Emily Olin, Parkside Elementary Most precipitation falls from a cloud in the form of snow initially. The temperature profile of our atmosphere is what determines what type of precipitation will reach the ground. If the whole atmosphere is near … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist – Cloud Seeding

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “What is cloud seeding?” Janine Muse Connections Academy Gold Hill There are several types of cloud seeding, but the one done at the Rogue Valley International Medford Airport involves releasing a balloon that disperses crushed dry ice. Other ways include shooting a canister into the fog/clouds with silver iodide or dry ice … Continue reading »

Ask the Met: How Computer Models Work

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “How do the weather computers know what the weather is going to be like a few days before it happens?” Jon Thomas, Central Point Our viewers always hear us mention the computer models or the weather models. What we don’t get to mention is how these computer models generate their own … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist – Upward Lightning

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “What causes lightning to go up from the clouds, and what is it called?” Aaliyah Linn Grants Pass There are many types of lightning. The ones that we are all familiar with occur between the clouds and the ground or in between the clouds. However, there are more types out there. Some … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist – Fog

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “What causes ground fog?” Riley Valle Rogue River Fog is actually more difficult to forecast than a cold front or a warm front. Fog forms when the air temperature drops to the dewpoint, which is the temperature at which condensation can form. It is easier to form fog with a higher dewpoint … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Dew Points

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “What is dew point?” Victoria Daugherty, Yreka The dew point is a direct measure of how much moisture is in our air. It is recorded using the Fahenrehit scale so does reflect a temperature. Another way to think of the dew point, is the temperature at which the air must cool … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist – Tornadoes

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “Why does Oregon not get tornadoes?” Aleah Tobey Grants Pass New Hope Christian School As far back as reporting goes there has never been a tornado in Josephine or Jackson County, but there have been tornados in Oregon. In fact there have been 403 tornadoes in the Northwest and 102 have occurred … Continue reading »

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