Ask the Meteorologist: Tsunamis

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “Why do tsunamis form?” Mrs.  Schultz’s 6th grade class, St. Mary’s School in Medford Tsunamis can form from events that occur either above or below the water, but most of the time, they get their origins beneath the water’s surface.  The word is Japanese, meaning “harbor wave.”  Earthquakes, landslides, and volcanic eruptions … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Grants Pass Temp

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “Where do you get the temperature for Grants Pass?” Laura Dreiling, Rogue Community College Temperatures in Grants Pass are obtained by using mesonet sites.  That stands for “mesoscale network,” a series of weather observation sites scattered across the landscape at a much higher concentration than airport observation stations.  The term “mesoscale” by … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Acid Rain

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “What does the term ‘acid rain’ mean?” 4th/5th Grade, Vineyard Christian School Acid rain is rain that is unusually acidic. In other words, it has high levels of hydrogen ions. Other forms of precipitation, in addition to rain, can be acidic. Freezing rain and snow being two examples. Acid precipitation can be … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: The Chetco Effect

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST What is the Chetco Effect, and Why Does it Only Happen in Brookings? If you are a native to Southern Oregon or Northern California, you have probably heard of the Chetco Effect. It is a naturally occurring weather phenomenon that is exclusive to the Brookings Harbor area. It is when warm air … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Anvil Clouds

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “What is an Anvil Cloud?” Alexander Lopez – Eagle Point Anvil clouds, also known as “Cumulonimbus Incus” are a very common concurrence when thunderstorms are present. When cumulus clouds start growing and expanding, updrafts in the storm continue pushing the cloud particles into the upper atmosphere. At this point, winds begin to … Continue reading »

Ask the Met: How Rainbows Form

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “How do rainbows form?” Carmen Silva, Orchard Hill Elementary Rainbows cannot form without clouds and without rain drops. Rain drops do not always need to be reaching the ground and can still form a rainbow in the sky whether the rain is falling to the surface or not. White light, another … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Thunder

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “What Causes Thunder?” Kanai Liufau, Medford Montessori In the spring, the last bit of winter air moves in above the warmer air at the surface. Because of this phenomenon, thunderstorms become more numerous. As the name suggests, thunder is a key factor in these storms. But what causes this phenomenon? Thunder is … Continue reading »

Ask the Met: Dry Heat in Oregon

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “Why is it that the heat feels so different in the summer months here in Oregon as opposed to other parts of our country like Texas and Oklahoma?” Connor, Medford Here in Oregon we have a dry heat — this means that the moisture content in our air is very low. … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist – Measuring Rain

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “How do you know how much it rains? Do you guess or go outside and measure it?” Michael Hogue South Medford High School We have many tools at our disposal to find out how much it has rained in many locations. Since we can’t go outside and measure the rain ourselves in … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Tornadoes

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “Why don’t we have tornadoes in Oregon; is it based on weather patterns, jet stream or topography? Which state has the most tornadoes and which the least?” Derek Cole, Medford One of the main reasons we don’t see a lot of severe weather across the Pacific Northwest is the lack of … Continue reading »

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