Ask the Met: El Nino

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “Why does El Nino make storms?” Lillyann El Nino impacts the weather not just here in the United States but across the entire globe. The El Nino Southern Oscillation is an oceanic phenomena that refers to a warm pool of water typically located just north and east of Australia. During an El … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Flooding

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “How do floods happen?” Kason, 3rd Kennedy Elementary Floods are, of course, caused by too much rainfall in either a short amount of time, or too much rain without a place for it to drain.  Sometimes it’s a combination of the two.  In this instance, we are going to talk about what … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Wind

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “Where does wind come from?” Chase, Griffin Creek Elementary Winds are caused by differences in atmospheric pressure.  Areas of high and low pressure form when we have a lot of either warm or cold air in place.  Cold air is related to more stable, sinking air, and therefore is also related to … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Fog

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “Is Fog Formed From Clouds?” Samantha G. It’s the time of the year where morning fog is becoming a staple in the forecast. Fog has many different types, but essentially forms because of a process known as condensation. This is the same process that clouds form by. So technically, fog is a … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Average Rainfall

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “What is the average amount of rain in the Rogue Valley?” Abby, 6th Grader at St. Mary’s School When we talk about climate data for the Rogue Valley, we have to use the data for Medford.  That’s because there are no other official reporting stations in the area.  For example, we have … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Waterspouts

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST Isaac, Ashland Middle School Tornadoes that we see over the ocean are called waterspouts! There are two types …fair weather and tornadic. Tornadic waterspouts are simply tornadoes over water that develop from cumulonimbus clouds, or thunderstorm clouds. Fair weather waterspouts on the other hand, do not develop from thunderstorms but instead form … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Cloud Bases

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST Aidan, Bellview Elementary First we’ll explain how we get clouds, because this well help you to understand how and why their bases tend to be flat … The sun everyday heats the earth’s surface. Even when there are clouds present, the sun is heating the air. This leads to warming near … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Water Colors

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “Aren’t clouds supposed to be blue because they have lots of water in them?” Anshuman Singh, Bellview Elementary in Ashland Anshuman is referring to the ocean, and why the ocean, which is made up of water, is blue.  Well, clouds are made of water too, but they are white.  So what is … Continue reading »

Ask the Met: Largest Hailstone in U.S.

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST The largest hailstone ever recorded was 8″ in diameter, found in Vivian South Dakota on July 23, 2010. It’s circumference measured 18.62″ and weighed nearly 2 pounds! This hail was produced from a thunderstorm that moved through the state. Apparently it was even larger than what was measured but because the … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Tornado Size

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “How big can a tornado get?  How can you tell a tornado is on its way?” Kristapher Kinzel, Medford Pretty big! The largest tornado on record touched down on May 31, 2013 just south of El Reno, Oklahoma.  At its widest, the base of the tornado measured 2.6 miles across.  To put that … Continue reading »

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