Ask the Meteorologist: Cirrus Clouds

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “What is the maximum altitude of a cirrus cloud?” Will, Mr. Ward’s class, St. Mary’s School Cirrus clouds are those high thin wispy clouds, seen high up in the sky. They get their name from cirro, the root word that means hair curl. Because they are so high in the sky … Continue reading »

Ask the Met: Why Do We Have Seasons?

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “Why does the weather change every season?” 6th grades in Mrs. Schultz’s class at St. Mary’s School The main reason for the seasons is the tilt of the Earth’s axis! The Earth is tilted at 23 degrees as it orbits around the sun. This changes how high the sun is in … Continue reading »

Ask the Met: Can Rain Evaporate?

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “Can rain evaporate before it hits the ground?” William, Mr. Ward’ 6th Grade Class St. Mary’s School Rain can certainly evaporate before reaching the ground and this is something we see quite often around here! This is very common during the summer months and right now, as we head into fall. … Continue reading »

Ask the Met: Dry Heat in Oregon

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “Why is it that the heat feels so different in the summer months here in Oregon as opposed to other parts of our country like Texas and Oklahoma?” Connor, Medford Here in Oregon we have a dry heat — this means that the moisture content in our air is very low. … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Lightning

Lightning is an electric discharge, or electric current, in our atmosphere that forms from opposite charges within thunderstorm clouds. These clouds, otherwise known as cumulonimbus clouds, are made up of ice crystals and water droplets that collide with one another and begin forming charges as a result of the collisions. After some time, the charges … Continue reading »