Ask the Met: What It’s Like to be on TV

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “What is it like to be on TV?” Makenzie, Ms. O’Looney’s Class, Griffin Creek Elementary

Ask the Meteorologist: Flooding

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “How long can a flood be?” Dom, Griffin Creek Elementary Floods can last hours, to days to weeks! It all depends on what kind of flood we are talking about. There are two main elements to floods that give us a good idea as to how long they will last. The first … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Weather Observing

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “How do you make good observations?” Mrs. Einck’s Kindergarten Class, Griffin Creek Elementary There are indeed correct ways to observe the weather! There are so many different platforms meteorologists use to analyze the current conditions of the atmosphere. For example, satellite and radar, water vapor imagery, buoy reports, metar reports, station plots, … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Hurricanes

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST The most common type of weather changes based on location! Here in the Valley fog is very common this time of year. We also tend to see a lot of rain in the winter months in our valleys and snow across the high country. Unfortunately though, in recent weeks we have not … Continue reading »

Ask the Met: How to Forecast Weather

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “How can you tell what weather is coming when?” Kristen One of the most helpful tools in weather forecasting is satellite imagery. This tells us many different things ranging from storm track, storm history, whether the system is strengthening or weakening, etc. Just looking at satellite imagery we can pinpoint where … Continue reading »

Ask the Met: El Nino

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “Why does El Nino make storms?” Lillyann El Nino impacts the weather not just here in the United States but across the entire globe. The El Nino Southern Oscillation is an oceanic phenomena that refers to a warm pool of water typically located just north and east of Australia. During an El … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Waterspouts

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST Isaac, Ashland Middle School Tornadoes that we see over the ocean are called waterspouts! There are two types …fair weather and tornadic. Tornadic waterspouts are simply tornadoes over water that develop from cumulonimbus clouds, or thunderstorm clouds. Fair weather waterspouts on the other hand, do not develop from thunderstorms but instead form … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Cloud Bases

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST Aidan, Bellview Elementary First we’ll explain how we get clouds, because this well help you to understand how and why their bases tend to be flat … The sun everyday heats the earth’s surface. Even when there are clouds present, the sun is heating the air. This leads to warming near … Continue reading »

Ask the Met: Largest Hailstone in U.S.

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST The largest hailstone ever recorded was 8″ in diameter, found in Vivian South Dakota on July 23, 2010. It’s circumference measured 18.62″ and weighed nearly 2 pounds! This hail was produced from a thunderstorm that moved through the state. Apparently it was even larger than what was measured but because the … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Tornadoes

 ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “Does it have to be a certain degree, super warm or super cold or in between, for a tornado to go a certain distance?” Sofie, Mae Richardson There is no correlation between contrasting air masses and the duration or direction of a tornado. In other words, the temperatures/clashing of air masses do not … Continue reading »

Older posts «