Winter Storm Warning Wx Alerts
Livestream View Now

NCAA Charges University of Oregon with Seven Rules Violations

The University of Oregon admitted to seven rules violations charged by the NCAA on Thursday.

Posted: Dec. 22, 2017 1:00 AM
Updated: Dec. 22, 2017 1:00 AM

EUGENE, Ore.—The University of Oregon has admitted to seven rules violations against four of its athletics programs.

Scroll for more content...

On Thursday, the NCAA alleged a significant breach in conduct and Oregon made the notice against its football, track and basketball teams public.

All the infractions were self-reported initially, which means Oregon isn’t refuting that any of them actually happened.

Instead, the Ducks are contesting the severity of the wrongdoings, particularly the charge against men’s basketball coach Dana Altman and women’s basketball coach Kelly Graves for failure to monitor their programs.

“After careful review of the notice, the UO acknowledges that infractions occurred and takes responsibility for the actions of the involved staff members,” the school responded in a statement. “The university, however, disagrees with the level of infraction that NCAA enforcement staff has assigned to some of the charges as well as with the decision to level charges against two of our head coaches. In those instances, the facts do not support the enforcement staff’s position nor does NCAA case precedent, and we plan to defend the university, our faculty and our head coaches.”

The NCAA points to both basketball programs exceeding the limit of four coaches. Oregon has recognized that unauthorized staff members did participate in team practices, though is disputing that Altman and Graves should be held responsible.

The football team’s infractions date back to the Mark Helfrich era, and the violations occurred when electronic presentations included prospective student-athlete’s names, physical attributes and other specific characteristics that the NCAA forbids.

The track and field case is in regards to Jasmine Todd, who benefitted from a professor changing her failing grade to a “B-.” Todd had been declared academically ineligible before the 2016 NCAA West Regionals.

Article Comments