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Cloudy Week Ahead

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WEATHER DISCUSSION

This week will see a few unimpressive storm systems move in starting on Monday afternoon. Unfortunately clouds will be the big story for these systems. High pressure built in over the area will continue to break down these storms as they move in keeping the majority of precipitation to the north of us. A series of weak cold fronts will move in with these storms and because of the cooler air and cloud presence, temperatures will be 10-15 degrees cooler. Temperatures will finally be closer to the seasonal average instead of (like last week) being closer to record temperatures.

Precipitation is not looking favorable for next week. As of now, only light and isolated showers are expected overnight on Thursday along the coast, Basin and in the mountain locations. Elsewhere will just see cloud coverage. Another round of light precipitation is expected on Sunday for the Basin, mountains and North California. All of these showers will be light and only a few hundredths of an inch of rainfall will be all that is likely.

Don’t forget about the total lunar eclipse scheduled for late Monday night and early Tuesday morning. North America has the prime viewing location for this one and it will be magnificent. Unfortunately, clouds will move in during the day Monday, but the system is tracking to the north so we don’t expect as many clouds as previously thought. As of now, models are showing that all counties other than Coos and Douglas should be relatively cloud free for the event. If you happen to be in one of the areas that are experiencing cloud coverage, NASA will be hosting the entire event, live on their website.  The entire event begins at 9:53 p.m. Monday night. The West Coast will be able to view the eclipse darkening starting at 10:57 p.m. on Monday night. This will be the ”partial” stage where the shadow will start to become visible. The total phase (darkest stage) will occur between 12:06 a.m. and 1:24 a.m. on Tuesday, with the midpoint occurring at 12:45 a.m. The entire eclipse will end at about 2:33 a.m.

Thanks for logging on and have a great week!

Meteorologist Seth Phillips

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