Ask the Meteorologist: Forecasting

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “How can you estimate the amount of rain and snowfall we will receive from a storm?” Chase Tiffany, Ashland Middle School When putting a forecast together, meteorologists look at computer models. These models generate a forecast (that requires modification & many changes) based on the current conditions of our atmosphere. These … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist – Acid Snow

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “Has there ever been acid snow and is it possible?” Garret Marcoulier Applegate School Acid precipitation can occur in any form of precipitation: rain, snow, sleet, etc. Acid precipitation forms from acidic gases (sulfur dioxide and sulfuric acid) released into the atmosphere from natural and non-natural sources such as volcanoes and wildfires … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Green Screen

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “How do you know what you are pointing at in front of the green screen?” Crosby L, Bellview Elementary Crosby is just one of many people who wonder how meteorologists do the weather in front of the green wall. When standing in front of the green screen, we are able to … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist – Weather Movement

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “Does weather always move west to east?” Linda Berger Jacksonville Weather tends to follow the Jet-stream which has a west to east movement across the world, however the Jet-stream can dip and rise which can cause systems to dig south or push north. High pressure tends to keep the weather pattern further … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Chetco Effect

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST How come the Chetco River effects the weather in Brookings but the Rogue River has no affect on the weather in Gold Beach? Curtis Kline, Medford The Chetco Effect is just a phrase too account for the very warm easterly winds that can ever so quickly warm Brookings into the 70′s … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist – Lenticular Cloud

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “Why do lenticular clouds form on Mt Shasta?” Gary Barnes Klamath Falls Lenticular clouds, or Altocumulus Standing Lenticular (ACSL) form from waves in the atmosphere that develop when fast moving stable air is forced upwards over a mountain. Mountains cause what’s called Orographic Lifting, which means air is forced to rise due … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist – The Sky

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST – THE SKY “What is the sky?” Hannah Miller Redwood Elementary The sky is a mixture of gases and the two predominant gases are Nitrogen and Oxygen. Nitrogen (N2) makes up 78% of the atmosphere and Oxygen(O2) represents 21% while the remaining 1% are trace gases, Argon gas and water make up … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Winds at Night

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “Why does the wind typically die down in the evening hours?” Allison Waters, Mae Richardson The main reason the winds tend to die down in the overnight hours is because there is no sun. At nighttime, the surface and objects at the surface emit longwave radiation. This cools not only those … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist – Tornadoes

“Has there ever been a tornado in Josephine or Jackson County? What conditions would it take for that event to happen?” LeeAnn Wright RCC As far back as reporting goes there has never been a tornado in Josephine or Jackson county, but there have been tornadoes in Oregon. In fact there have been 403 tornadoes … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Snowflakes

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST What causes snow to be light or heavy and what causes snowflake size and shape? Keith Hull Rogue River High School There are two types of snow, wet snow and dry snow. Wet snow tends to be heavy and normally will bring larger snowflakes to the surface. Dry snow on the … Continue reading »

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