Ask the Meteorologist: Cloud Bases

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST Aidan, Bellview Elementary First we’ll explain how we get clouds, because this well help you to understand how and why their bases tend to be flat … The sun everyday heats the earth’s surface. Even when there are clouds present, the sun is heating the air. This leads to warming near … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Water Colors

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “Aren’t clouds supposed to be blue because they have lots of water in them?” Anshuman Singh, Bellview Elementary in Ashland Anshuman is referring to the ocean, and why the ocean, which is made up of water, is blue.  Well, clouds are made of water too, but they are white.  So what is … Continue reading »

Ask the Met: Largest Hailstone in U.S.

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST The largest hailstone ever recorded was 8″ in diameter, found in Vivian South Dakota on July 23, 2010. It’s circumference measured 18.62″ and weighed nearly 2 pounds! This hail was produced from a thunderstorm that moved through the state. Apparently it was even larger than what was measured but because the … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Tornado Size

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “How big can a tornado get?  How can you tell a tornado is on its way?” Kristapher Kinzel, Medford Pretty big! The largest tornado on record touched down on May 31, 2013 just south of El Reno, Oklahoma.  At its widest, the base of the tornado measured 2.6 miles across.  To put that … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Units of Pressure

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “What are the different units of pressure and why?” Nancy Wieber, Grants Pass There are a few different units of atmospheric pressure, but the most commonly used by meteorologists is millibars.  You may have also heard of inches of mercury, which is used for mercury barometers and is another fairly common unit of pressure.  … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Newscast Preps

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “How long does it take you to get all the reports, satellite data and other data to do your weather forecasts? Cameron, Rae Micharson Love this question! Prepping for our newscasts requires a lot of work and a lot of time. Us meteorologists have to come in hours before we go live … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Cloud Color

 ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “Why are clouds white?” Mrs. Schultz’s Class, St. Mary’s School Why are clouds white? Well, it has to do with the kind of light that is reflected through the water droplets that make up the cloud. These droplets are large enough to scatter the light of all seven wavelengths, those being red, … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Hurricanes

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “Is it possible for a really small hurricane to be happening and for nobody to know about it?” Marcus, Mae Richardson Love this question Marcus! In this day and age, it would be very unlikely that a hurricane would develop and it would remain unknown. There are many resources available to meteorologists … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Lightning

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “Why does rain not always bring lightning and thunder?” Ainsley, St. Mary’s School The answer to this question lies in the height of the clouds that produce the rain.  When showers move through, they fall from shorter, more shallow clouds.  That means the separation of charges that causes lightning in the first … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Cirrus Clouds

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “What is the maximum altitude of a cirrus cloud?” Will, Mr. Ward’s class, St. Mary’s School Cirrus clouds are those high thin wispy clouds, seen high up in the sky. They get their name from cirro, the root word that means hair curl. Because they are so high in the sky … Continue reading »

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