Ask the Met: How Computer Models Work

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “How do the weather computers know what the weather is going to be like a few days before it happens?” Jon Thomas, Central Point Our viewers always hear us mention the computer models or the weather models. What we don’t get to mention is how these computer models generate their own … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist – Upward Lightning

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “What causes lightning to go up from the clouds, and what is it called?” Aaliyah Linn Grants Pass There are many types of lightning. The ones that we are all familiar with occur between the clouds and the ground or in between the clouds. However, there are more types out there. Some … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist – Fog

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “What causes ground fog?” Riley Valle Rogue River Fog is actually more difficult to forecast than a cold front or a warm front. Fog forms when the air temperature drops to the dewpoint, which is the temperature at which condensation can form. It is easier to form fog with a higher dewpoint … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Dew Points

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “What is dew point?” Victoria Daugherty, Yreka The dew point is a direct measure of how much moisture is in our air. It is recorded using the Fahenrehit scale so does reflect a temperature. Another way to think of the dew point, is the temperature at which the air must cool … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist – Tornadoes

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “Why does Oregon not get tornadoes?” Aleah Tobey Grants Pass New Hope Christian School As far back as reporting goes there has never been a tornado in Josephine or Jackson County, but there have been tornados in Oregon. In fact there have been 403 tornadoes in the Northwest and 102 have occurred … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Thunderstorms

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST How do thunderstorms develop? Laura C., South Medford High School There are three ingredients that go into building a thunderstorm & that are responsible for any severe weather for that matter. First and foremost, moisture must be present in the atmosphere. Typically moisture filters into the Northwest when a southwesterly wind … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist – Green Screen

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “How do you know what is on the green screen?” Carly Knecht Ashland Middle School This is a question I often get on school visits and it’s always fun to explain. When I stand in front of the green wall I have a camera in front of me and two monitors on … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Earthquakes

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “Why don’t we get earthquakes like the other states?” Alexis W., Hillside Elementary Alexis asked this question quite a while ago but I decided to answer it given the recent discussion about earthquakes in the West. We all know after the past few months that even here in Oregon we can … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist – Snow Levels

ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “Why does Medford get rain while Chiloquin gets snow?” Zack Chapman Chiloquin The answer to this question has to do with snow levels and the elevations of these two areas. The snow level is the level precipitation is able to fall to in the form of snow, snow levels are determined by … Continue reading »

Ask the Meteorologist: Earning a Degree

  ASK THE METEOROLOGIST “How many years of college are needed to be a meteorologist?” Kailee Bell, Ashland  Four years of schooling is required to get a degree in meteorology. If you don’t include all of the general education requirements, it is 2 years. The core classes in a meteorology degree do require A LOT … Continue reading »

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