HarryDavid-LogoMEDFORD, Ore.– 1-800-Flowers is acquiring all of Harry and David, Inc.

This includes the headquarters, manufacturing and distribution facilities and orchards in Medford, the websites, warehouses and distribution facilities, and 47 Harry & David retail stores located throughout the country.

The deal should be completed in October.

 

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WEATHER DISCUSSION

High pressure continues to bring sunny skies and quiet weather. Winds are starting off out of the NE this morning and that is keeping smoke out of Ft. Jones and Yreka. This will likely change through the course of the day as winds shift again …this around, to the NNW. Smoke will then move back into Central Siskiyou County.

Tonight though, another shift is in store! A cold front is expected to sweep through the Northwest tonight. That is going to help pick our winds up. Winds will then change to the NNE tonight into Wednesday. As this happens, humidities will drop as well. This is going to be a dry front with moisture very limited across our area. For these reasons, new starts could ignite quickly and increased fire behavior on existing wildfires is possible.

A fire weather watch has been issued by the National Weather Service for the Cascades, Siskiyous and Western Siskiyou County. It goes into effect starting tonight for the Siskiyous and potions of Northern California …and then tomorrow morning for the Cascades.

Aside from this heightened risk for fire weather, it will remain quiet. Offshore winds or the lack of onshore winds ..will help to keep the coast clear for a majority of the week. Temperatures will also be mild there as a result. Inland, we’ll cool down a bit Wednesday and Thursday but warm back into the mid 80′s east of the Cascades Friday and the mid 90′s west.

If you’d like more on your local weather, head over to Facebook and/or Twitter!

Meteorologist Alyssa Caroprese

happy camp00000002HAPPY CAMP, Ore. — The Happy Camp Complex has burned 66,335 acres and is 15 percent contained, but it continues to grow. Happy Camp Complex Fire Officials said in a release early Tuesday morning that there is a fire weather watch in effect from Tuesday evening into Wednesday evening due to a combo of strong winds and low humidity and there is a likelihood that the fire will reach communities.

Fire officials are concerned the fire will spread into Hamburg and Scott Bar along Scott River Road. There is currently a mandatory evacuation issued for those areas. Residents who have not evacuated, including the community of Sunny Slope are “highly encouraged” to reconsider and leave as soon as possible, before the fire reaches the area.

As the fire approaches these areas, emergency apparatus and firefighters will need complete access to these roads in order to reach homes. Fire officials urge that residential traffic attempting to leave this area will complicate these efforts and endanger both civilians and firefighters.

Tuesday’s weather is calling for warm and dry conditions, combined with unstable air aloft, suggesting the fire will burn extremely hot this afternoon if it  breaks through the inversion, according to fire officials. It’s possible a large column of smoke with burning embers may cause spotting ahead of the fire up to 1.5 miles.

Firefighters are continuing to work on prepping the upper section of the Scott River Road by removing fuels around homes and along the roadway today. CAL Fire is also putting in contingency dozer lines along Scott Bar Mountain between Bucker Ridge and Little Ferry Road.

Evacuations: Mandatory evacuation orders are in place along Scott River Road from Bridge Flat to the intersection of Hwy 96 and all areas south of Hwy 96 between Scott River Road and Cade Summit. The Siskiyou County Sheriff’s Department will be patrolling 24 hours in the evacuated areas.

Advisory Evacuations are in effect for all areas north of Hwy 96 between Scott River Road and Grider Creek. Residents in advisory evacuation areas should begin preparing for a potential evacuation order. People in need of assistance with livestock or for additional information contact the Siskiyou County Sheriff Department at (530) 841-2900.

Fire officials are reporting that it’s unknown how long these evacuations will last, but notice will be given as soon as it is safe to return to your homes.

Traffic Control: Highway 96 remains open, however travelers should expect extended delays as pilot cars assist safe movement around firefighters and equipment from the intersection of Highway 96 and Scott River Road to Walker Creek Road. These measures will be in place as long as fire and smoke conditions dictate.

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Medford, Ore.– From the very first time the Holly theatre opened its doors in 1930, it’s been a landmark building in Medford. The last 30 years or so though, it’s been more of a silent monument to the days when movies were one of the primary forms of entertainment. Local historian George Kramer observes that, “movies were one of the few industries in America that really did well during the depression. You could go see a movie for nickel or a dime. People could still afford it, and it was a couple hours of escape! You saw cartoons. You saw newsreels. You saw the motion pictures of the day, in a beautiful setting. And maybe you forgot that it wasn’t so great outside the theatre.”

The Holly has had an up and down history in the more than 8 decades since it was built and opened. When it was built, it was different from most other movie houses of the day, and the half dozen or so in Medford. “This is really the first theatre that was designed in Medford  specifically for “talkies”, says Kramer. And it was much, much bigger. He adds, “It had the acoustics for talkies. And when the Holly theatre opened a tenth of Medford could go to a show!”

Randy McKay of “Jefferson Live”, which is working to restore the old theatre and operate it as a performing arts venue says, “it started construction just 3 weeks after the stock market crash that began the great depression. So they were anxious to get it open quickly and to not have to do any touchups to it later depending on the whims of public entertainment. So, while it was designed for talkies, just in case that was a fad and ‘silents’ came back, they put in these beautiful boxes here in the off chance they needed to install pipe organ pipes and put a pipe organ in to accompany the ‘silents’ when they came back. And just in case film altogether was a fad and died out, they did the unthinkable. They built a full stage, a fly loft for scenery, an orchestra pit, a dressing room, none of which would’ve been built in a movie theatre just a few years later.”

And off and on for more than 50 years the Holly was the showcase movie house in the Rogue Valley. But it fell into disrepair following a renovation in the ’70′s, and closed its doors. McKay says it’s a blessing those other features were originally added, now that the Holly is being transformed into a performing arts center. The outside facade, including the marquee and pylon sign have been restored and new windows put in place. Now the focus is on the inside, which has been taken down to its basic core for remodeling to its former glory.

Kramer says, “everybody had a good seat and there was a thousand seats in there, and so they would do the really big shows. The really popular movies would play at the holly!”Donors can now “buy” seats with their donations. Chandeliers and other fixtures are also up for sponsorship to raise the additional two million needed to restore the Holly.  The restoration of the Holly theatre is expected to cost a little over four million dollars. Supporters say that they’ve already reached half that amount. They hope if fundraising goes as they anticipate, construction on the completion of the inside could begin sometime next year.

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GRANTS PASS, Ore. – Summer doesn’t officially end for three more weeks, but Labor Day is sort of that reminder that Fall is quickly approaching. It’s the last holiday of the season, and it’s the last hydroplane race of the Cal-Ore season. The Wild River Labor Day Regatta on the Rogue River. There’s really three key events on the Cal-Ore schedule: the Tom Rice Memorial Day Boatnik Race, the Lower Rogue Challenge on 4th of July in Gold Beach and then Monday’s Regatta. Tyler McGinnis of Gold Beach came into the race as the points leader, but he says he comes to Grants Pass for more than just hydroplanes.

“Every year it’s a big family-occasion, and we come over,” McGinnis said. “We camp, and oftentimes there’s 30 of us so it’s kind of a good closure to the summer.”
“Labor Day is the last holiday of the season,” longtime racer Don Burnison said, “and for some of the people, they enjoy coming to the river, spending the weekend on the river and getting to watch the races. It’s a great family sport, and everybody seems to get along very well.”

But someone has to win, and that someone was Tyler McGinnis. Jeff Lewis finished second. Joel and Justin Hood followed. McGinnis is on quite a roll this year. He finished first in the Boatnik, but a rules technicality cost him the first leg which pushed him back to third, but then he won the Gold Beach race, and he takes Monday’s contest and therefore the season standings. McGinnis has his own business in Gold Beach and was recently married so it makes this win even more impressive because he hasn’t had a lot of time to practice this summer.

“Well, this summer, not a lot,” McGinnis said. “I had a busy summer so not a lot of time to work on the race boat stuff so I was fortunate to even make it here.”
“This is his moment in time,” Burnison said, “and he is an excellent racer. He’s got excellent equipment, and he’s going to be dominant until somebody else comes along.”

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MEDFORD, Ore. — The largest air tankers in the country were both at the Medford Air Tanker base on Monday as they fought the fast-growing Happy Camp Complex.

While these tankers are top of the line for fire resources. Fire officials say they are also not cheap. Each flight costs about about 38,000 dollars, 25,000 dollars in retardant, and another 13 thousand in flight time.

Officials say the tankers can carry up to 11,000 gallons of retardant per load,
more than double what other tankers housed in Medford can carry.

Most of the tankers at the Medord Air Tanker Base carry 2,000, 3,000, or 4,000 gallons per trip.

The tankers are rarely at the same base at the same time, and officials say Medford is one of the only bases in Oregon that can accommodate both.

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WEATHER DISCUSSION

This weekend’s cold front dropped temperatures down to the 80′s, but highs on Labor Day were much warmer.  Lots of sunshine sent temperatures into the lower 90′s in the Rogue Valley, and even along the coast in Brookings, highs were in the upper 80′s.  Warmer temperatures on the coast were due to the Chetco Effect,  which will continue for the next few days.

High pressure has been building in over the Pacific Northwest over the past 24 hours, and for the most part, that will persist through the week.  We will see a dry cold front try to make its way through the area, but the cold air may struggle to make a big impact.  This is the one forecast uncertainty across the next several days.  As a thermal trough forms in our region, very warm air will settle in, making it harder for the cold air from the cold front to push through and drop temperatures by a substantial amount.  Even with models predicting highs in the lower and middle 80′s (an almost ten degree drop behind the front), actual highs will more likely only be a couple of degrees cooler behind the front.

We will continue to watch the development of this warmer air and the impact of the cold front.  One aspect of the forecast that does look a bit more certain: the end of the week will be hot, with highs several degrees above average for both Friday and Saturday.  This hot, dry weather will impact the fire fights around the region, which we will also be monitoring.  The smoke forecast for Tuesday involves a strong westerly component to the wind, which will be pushing smoke and haze back into southern portions of the Klamath Basin and central Siskiyou County.  Other locations will be seeing lots of sunshine.

For more information, or to send me your weather pictures, head over to Facebook or Twitter.

Chief Meteorologist Kate McKenna

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MEDFORD, Ore. – With Labor Day weekend wrapping up, people are hitting the mall and other retail shops for some last minute back to school shopping.

This year though shoppers are not just stocking up the pens, pencils, binders, and the latest name brand clothing, they are stuffing their carts with high-tech gadgets as well.

Connecting Point in Medford said laptops are still the number one tech item for back to school, but managers said they are also seeing lots of families coming in to purchase tablets and smart phones for their students.

According to the National Retail Federation, people spend more money shopping during the back to school season than any other time of the year besides Christmas.

This year clothing still tops the list when it comes to favorite back to school shopping items, with the average shopper spending $223 on jeans, and name brand t-shirts.  However, spending on electronics is on the rise.    The average family is expected to spend $211 equipping their child with the latest computer related equipment.

“Kids certainly going off to college certainly have to take technology with them, whether it’s a laptop, computer, iPad, tablet of sort, they have to have those things to be successful,” said Jeff Thomas, the General Manager of Connecting Point.

In 2014, more people are also skipping the store all together.  The NRF estimates 22 percent of back to school shoppers are buying what they need online, using their smart phones or tablets.

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PROSPECT, Ore. — All 4,000 feet of the runway at the  Prospect State Airport are being used by helicopters to aid in the firefight, as they bring both crews and supplies right to the fire line.

Helicopters dotted the sky above prospect, constantly returning to the helibase to fill up on supplies before heading right back out. More than 400 firefighters are spending the night at the fire line, and the best way to get resources to them is by air.

“The majority of our firefighters are not returning here to the fire camp at night.  They are staying out on or near the fire line in the wilderness because it’s so far to get in there and get out every day,” said 790 Fire public information officer Jeanne Klein.

Originally a fire caused by lightning from a late July thunderstorm, the 790 fire has been burning ever since.

“Also, at the time this was started, there was a very high demand for resources- meaning crews and personnel to fight the fires. So these were prioritized and all the fires are out and this is the last remaining fire,” said Klein.

The Prospect State Airport has been closed to local pilots for weeks.

“Every other day or so he calls and says ‘what’s going on? Can I come in?’ and I say ‘no!’” said airport manager Walter Ridge.

Ridge said helibases have been set up here before, but not to this extent.

“We didn’t have the transporting of men out of here like they’ve been doing now,” said Ridge.

Steep and challenging terrain has led most crews to be flown to the fire. That same terrain is also working to fire fighter’s advantage.

“Rock out cropping and a lot of natural features that are causing the fire, when they run into those features, the fire activity lessens,” said Klein.

“For now, there’s no timeline as to when the Prospect State Airport will re-open, because it all depends on progress on the firefight.”

EUGENE, Oregon – Oregon quarterback MArcus Mariota, freshman runningback Royce Freeman and several wide receivers talk about Michigan State after Monday’s practice.

Oregon Quarterback Marcus Mariota:

Oregon Offensive Coordinator Scott Frost:

Oregon Running Back Royce Freeman:

Oregon Wide Receivers Coach Matt Lubick:

Oregon Wide Receiver Devon Allen:

Oregon Wide Receiver Darren Carrington:

Oregon Wide Receiver Dwayne Stanford:

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