video preview image

WEATHER DISCUSSION

The good news is that high pressure is here and we are going to have a wonderful Labor Day. The weekend was almost perfect, with the cooler air and mostly clear skies. I say almost, only because Northern California is still getting a bad dose of smoke coverage from the Happy Camp Complex. Winds out ahead of the ridge were pushing the smoke east and south east for most of the weekend. Areas like Yreka, Fort Jones, Etna, and Weed were all sitting in the “Unhealthy for All Groups” category for most of the weekend. As the winds would calm overnight, smoke would filter out. However, in the wake of the cold front, we’ve had a few afternoons of strong afternoon winds (including Sunday) which took the wind and spread it out to the southeast.

Good news for cities along the I-5 in Northern California. Winds on Labor Day will become northerly/northeasterly and will push the smoke away from those areas. Unfortunately this means smoke for other areas including Somes Bar, Willow Creek, and Orleans. Areas in the immediate area of the fire will see smoke (Like Happy Camp), and do expect haze in Fort Jones and Etna, especially in the morning before the winds completely shift.

At the coast, the Chetco will be hanging around for most of the week as we have broad offshore flow allowing for Brookings and nearby coastal towns to warm up into the lower to mid-70′s.

Back in Southern Oregon, almost crystal clear skies and a little bit warmer in the afternoon for Labor Day. The axis of the high pressure ridge will pass over at that time (thus, warmer temperatures). Wednesday morning, a dry cold front will pass and cool us off a bit. No moisture associated with it so we will stay dry.

Meteorologist Seth Phillips

facebook / twitter

Photos Submitted Today:

Herb Kennedy: Hungry Osprey at Agate Lake

Hungry Osprey

Missing Hikers

APPLEGATE LAKE, Ore. – Two hikers missing for more than five days have been found alive and well.

Keith Hoover and Julie Swisher were found near Applegate Lake Sunday afternoon. The two had ventured out on Tuesday for a three day hiking trip but got lost on the second day.

“They spent an additional two days trying to find the trail,” said Siskiyou County Sheriff’s Deputy Corp. Jeremiah LaRue. “That’s when they knew they were, in a  sense, lost.”

Fortunately, the two were able to find a cabin for shelter.

Deputies say they were able to survive because they planned ahead. The two had apparently brought several days’ worth of food as well as a water purifier to stay hydrated.

Swisher is now back home. Hoover was unable to make the hike out and was airlifted to the hospital for a precautionary checkup.

Deputies add the dog that the two took hiking with them is also doing well.

 

8-31 rob homelessMEDFORD, Ore. — A couple of small, folding tables is all it takes to make a difference in the day of those in need.

“We need to be a support to the most feeble in our community, the weakest in our community and help them,” Bobbie Holden with Friends Helping Friends.

Holden has organized “Friends Helping Friends” every Friday and Sunday for the past seven years. She said those with no home need help even when shelters close during the day.

“They’re out of the missions from this time to that time, so they have to have a place to be and it has to be at a park because it gets hot out there,” said Holden.

A new location is now needed for Holden’s group and others now that construction is set to begin.

“We’re trying to find a different location for them that would be more suitable during the construction of the park,” said Medford Parks and Rec. Director Brian Sjothun.

Medford Parks and Rec. is working with the groups and city council to find an alternative while the park is under construction.

“Some parking lots that the city owns, including some additional park sites and we’re right now analyzing those and we’ll bring it to the council at their second meeting in September,” said Sjothun.

Holden said she found out Sunday morning the Salvation Army’s Medford location will welcome her organization and their twice weekly food assistance. The move will take place starting on Friday, meaning Sunday was the last day at Hawthorne Park.

“They great us really nice. They’re very nice people, they love us, they give me hugs all the time and it’s really precious,” Holden.

Oregon State Head Coach Mike Riley:

Oregon State Quarterback Sean Mannion:

Oregon State Defensive End: Dylan Wynn:

Oregon State Safety Tyrequek Zimmerman:

Oregon head coach Mark Helfrich:

Oregon quarterback Marcus Mariota:

Oregon defensive coordinator Don Pellum:

Oregon offensive coordinator Scott Frost:

Oregon running back Byron Marshall:

Oregon running back Royce Freeman:

Oregon cornerback Ifo Ekpre-Olomu:

Oregon defensive lineman Arik Armstead:

Oregon wide receiver Charles Nelson:

8-31 rob gem showASHLAND, Ore. — Ashland’s only gem show is wrapping up this weekend, and organizers said overall they have seen steady attendance. More than 450 people attended the southern Oregon mineral and gem show Saturday, and with hundreds more today, organizers said it’s possible they’ll surpass last year’s attendance. The majority of the vendors are local, with some coming as far away as Redding. The promoter behind this gem show travels from Seattle to Tucson and said the gem shows are getting strong numbers to the north and south and Oregon won’t be far behind.

“A lot of the dealers have come to me and said they’ve done really well, better than last year. It’s kind of building and getting on the radar screen,” said Gem Show organizer Scott Blair.

Blair said the gem industry has recovered much better in California and Washington and expects Oregon to soon follow.

video preview image

NEAR SEIAD VALLEY, Calif. — The fires in Northern California continue to grow with the Happy Camp Complex expanding roughly 4500 acres overnight

More than 2000 firefighters on the complex still have a big job ahead of them.

On Friday, erratic winds hurled smoke and embers into the air and helped the fires grow by about 30 percent.

Now the two fires on that complex have merged into one. On Sunday, structure protection crews are scouring Highway 96 and Scott River Road hoping to protect the 695 threatened structures in the area.

Meanwhile, wildland crews say despite some low temperatures and high humidity over the past couple of days, the fire’s rapid spread is creating a big challenge.

“The fuels were very dry, even the large fuels, and then with the sunny days, warm temperatures added to that, and then we got winds that were aligned with the canyon. So with the canyon winds lining and the warm temperatures, it kind of blew the fire,” said Public Information Officer Dave Schmitt.

More and more personnel are being added to that firefight. 137 engines and 19 helicopters are also assisting. So far no structures have been lost or damaged from that fire.

Mandatory evacuations and advisories are currently in place for that complex, affecting around 250 homes.

All residents on Scott River Road from Bridge Flat to the intersection of Highway 96 are still under mandatory evacuations.

The same applies to all areas south of Highway 96 from Scott River Road down to Cade Summit.

Meanwhile evacuation advisories are in place for areas north of Highway 96 between Scott River Road and Grider Creek.

Crews also recommend caution for those travelling in the area as dense smoke has created low visibility conditions.

video preview image

MEDFORD, Ore — Medford Police are urging people to think twice before they get behind the wheel this Labor Day weekend.  This is because officers are cracking down on people driving under the influence.

On Friday night, Medford Police arrested seven people for DUIIs.  On Saturday night, the same amount of officers are hitting the streets again.

“Typically on a holiday weekend you are going to see a bigger crowd at the downtown bar scene, and I think that’s because there is just not the fear of having to work Monday morning,” said Sgt. Kirkpatrick with Medford Police.

Sgt. Kirkpatrick said when looking for people driving drunk, officers typically look for people driving poorly.  Those who fail to maintain a single lane of traffic, are driving too slow or too fast, or blow past a traffic light or stop sign, often send up a red flag.

He said the best way to stay safe while enjoying holiday festivities is to plan ahead of time.  If you know you are going to be drinking, have a designated driver in place or call a cab.

video preview image

Chris Leone and Brandon Kamerman go over the big storylines in the 2014 high school football season.

8-30 ROB WEB AIRPORTMEDFORD, Ore. — Three air tankers were on the ground Saturday afternoon. Their pilots were waiting for conditions to clear to get up in the air to make drops on the July and Happy Camp complexes. It was a different scene Friday, with six air tankers all working out of the base at once.

“That operation can be very difficult but also very exciting and trying to get them back up into the air, trying to get the retardant back to the firefighters is definitely rewarding,” said Air Tanker Base Manager Lonnie Allison.

On average about 235,000 gallons of retardant are dropped by planes out of the Medford base. This year, that number has already quadrupled. Part of the reason is more resources, including appearances by the largest air tankers in the country, the DC 10′S.

“We were talking to the tower, we were talking to the airport, can we do this? Can we bring two of them in at the same time? We were able to bring them in and get one out and one coming in at the same time, so that was very exciting,” said Allison.

This year a portable base able to accommodate the large aircraft was established making it the only place in the state that can accommodate the DC 10′S.

“They can not only take care of our immediate area, but they can go 500 miles in to California, cover most of Oregon, and into Nevada. So, not only are we helping the people here locally, but this plane also helps people far away,” said Allison.

Base officials said they don’t know when the DC 10′s will be back, but do expect them to return before fire season comes to a close.

Older posts «